Category Archives: Ocean Freight

Articles about ocean freight transportation and logistics

LCL ocean service from Bulgaria to Taiwan

The Bulgarian freight forwarder and logistics provider KG CARGO LTD offers LCL (Less-Than-Container-Load) from Bulgaria to Taiwan.

Depending on the customer’s requirements for tranzit time and cost we can provide services via CFS in Sofia and via CFS Varna.

The Sofia CFS option is faster but a bit more expensive. Routing is on a regular truck from Sofia to Antwerp port from where it gets on the vessels departing from Antwerp to Taichung, Keelung and Kaohsiung.

Truck departs every week from Sofia CFS and the tranzit time from Sofia is

to Taichung 50-51  days
to Kaohsiung 53-54 days
to Keelung  54-55 days

all of the above tranzit times are from departure from Sofia CFS to free arrival at the respective port inlcuding the waiting time in Antwerp.

LCL Routing from Sofia CFS via Antwerp to Taiwan

LCL Routing from Sofia CFS via Antwerp to Taiwan

The routing via Varna is a cheaper one, but it is fortnightly on an LCL service to Singapore where the goods are re-loaded to another consolidation box to Taiwan.

The tranzit times are:

from sailing from Varna to Taichung – 45-47 days
from sailing from Varna to Keelung – 44-46 days
from sailing from Varna to Kaohsiung – 42-44 days

LCL Routing from Varna CFS via Singapore CFS to Taiwan

LCL Routing from Varna CFS via Singapore CFS to Taiwan

 

On customer’s  request we can organize in Bulgaria:

– pick-up from shippers door
– export customs processing
– door-to-door service from Bulgaria to Taiwan

We highly recommend that you insure your goods. We can also organize this and the maritime insurance premiums on Clause A vary between 0.3% to 0.4% depends on the commodity and the routing and coverage requested. Some special goods might get even higher.

If you have requests for rates or if you would like to get more information about our services to Taiwan, please do not hesitate to contact us.

For more information on KG CARGO freight forwarding service please contact us.

LCL transportation from Bulgaria to New Zealand

New Zealand or almost the end of the world is interesting country providing interesting opportunities. The Bulgarian forwarding company KG CARGO Ltd. offers LCL ocean transportation from Bulgaria to New Zealand with consol box from Varna.

The consolidation container from Varna departs on every two weeks. Due the increased interest though, the departures become more often recently which lead to squeezing overall lead times.

The container is closing on the day before the scheduled departure.

Shipments are delivered in CFS  depots in the cities of Auckland and Wellington.

The transit time is as follows:

Varna – Auckland: 50 days
Varna – Wellington: 54 days

The transit time includes: time for departure from port Varna-West to Singapore, loading in Singapore and departure from Singapore to the New Zealand ports.

The logistics provider KG SID also offers  value-added services base on the consolidated container transportation:

– Pick-up of shipments from Bulgaria and the neighboring countries
– Export Customs Clearance
– Any other services that may arise in the course of the work.

For a quote please request your ocean freight rate.

For more information on schedules or for making orders, please contact KG CARGO – the Bulgarian freight and transportation logistics provider.

For more information on KG CARGO freight forwarding service please contact us.

LCL Transportation from Bulgaria to Australia

LCL to Australia postIf you need to send a small commercial shipment economically to Australia, LCL ocean transportation is the solution and Bulgarian freight forwarder KG SID will deliver it for you.

We offer regular fortnightly departures from a consolidation warehouse in Varna via port of Singapore to depots based in main Australian ports of Melbourne, Sydney, Freemantle, Brisbane and Adelaide.

Container closes the day before the scheduled departure and  because the service from Varna becomes more and more attractive, departures become frequent which squeezes the overall shipment lead time and makes the service even more attractive.

Transit times from departures from Varna port are:

to Melbourne: 49 days
to Sydney: 47 days
to Brisbane: 45 days
to Fremantle: 42 days
to Adelaide: 49 days

The transit time includes: time from departure from port Varna-West to sorting depot in Singapore, loading in Singapore and departure from Singapore to the Australian ports.

We also offer value added services such as:

Pick-up of shipments from Bulgaria and the neighboring countries
Export Customs Clearance
Any other services that may arise in the course of the work.

For quotation and schedules as well for orders please contact Bulgarian freight forwarder and logistics provider KG CARGO Ltd.

For more information on KG CARGO freight forwarding service please contact us.

Transportation services between Philippines and Bulgaria

Manila port - one of the busiest in the world

Manila port – one of the busiest in the world

The Republic of the Philippines, more commonly referred to as the Philippines is located in Southeast Asia, at 1,210 km from the coast of mainland Asia. The country consist of 7,107 islands, of which only about 10% are inhabited. Philippine  population is nearly 90 million. The capital is Manila, with a population over 11 million people which makes it one of the 20 largest metropolitan areas in the world.

The economy of the Philippines is still primarily agricultural, although light industry is growing. Philippines are 118th out of 178 countries in terms of GDP. Once the richest in Asia after Japan, the Philippine economy shrank in the early 1980s as a result of reduced demand for Philippine products. Attempts to improve the economy have been hampered by the large national debt of 77% of GDP. Interesting what would Greeks and Cypriots say to this.  Philippines is a member of the Asian Development Bank, World Bank, International Monetary Fund and other international economic organizations. Major trading partners of the Philippines are the United States and Japan.

Bulgarian forwarding company KG SID Ltd. offers a variety of freight and logistics services related to the transportation of loads  to and from the Philippines:

Export:

Air transport: We provide air cargo transportation from the airport Sofia as well as in specific cases from other airports in the European Union with the aim of offering cost-effective transportation at reasonable transit time.

LCL transportation: We offer service from Port of Varna as well as from the port of Antwerp. However, movement via port Varna is more cost effective with relatively the same tranzit time as the ocean movement via Antwerp.
In the port of Varna-West cargoes are consolidated and stuffed o a container which sails to the port of Singapore from where the goods are transhipped to Manila and Cebu ports. Container from Varna-West departs every 2 weeks and the transit time to Manila is about 40-41 days (includes transhipment time in Singapore) and to Cebu is 41-42 days.
For movement via Antwerp cargo is consolidated into CFS warehouse in Sofia, where every Friday a groupage truck departs for the Antwerp port where the loads are processed for final destination – CFS in  Manila and CFS in Cebu.
Transit time from departure of trucks from Sofia to the arrival at CFS in Manila is approximately 45-47 days, and to CFS Cebu approximately 51-52 days.

Ocean transportation export of full container loads: We offer services with various carriers via ports of Varna, Burgas and Thessaloniki, depending on your requirements for transit time and related transportation cost.

If you have any requests for air export, sea freight LCL or transport of full containers – FCL, please contact Bulgarian logistics and freight forwarding company KG CARGO.

Import:

Air Cargo: With the assistance of our partners from PFI Agents Network and Five Stars Network we offer airfreight transportation from Philippines via Manila airport to Bulgaria. Whether on a direct service to Sofia Airport or via some of the big European Airports, we can provide not only the air transportation but also such value added services like customs clearance and delivery do door.

LCL (Low Than a Container Load) – You can contact us direct for a quote on inbound LCL cargoes from Manila and Cebu to Varna. With excellent connections with leading NVOCC we can book your cargo from door to door with full transparency of cost and no hidden charges.
We offer services from CFS Manila and CFS Cebu via Hong Kong and via Singapore to Varna. Transit time in Hong Kong is about 41 days, and from Cebu about 42 days.

Ocean transportation of full containers – We offer services with various carriers via ports of Varna, Burgas and Thessaloniki, depending on your requirements for transit time and related transportation cost.  You can contact us direct for inbound cargoes of full containers from the Philippines.

If you have any transportation requests or require a quote for importing freight – via air freight,  LCL sea freight or ocean transportation of full containers from Philippines to Bulgaria or even near countries like Macedonia please contact Bulgarian logistics and freight forwarding company KG CARGO LTD.

For more information on KG CARGO freight forwarding service please contact us.

LCL from Bulgaria to South Africa

For your LCL ocean loads from Bulgaria to South Africa KG CARGO offers weekly departures from Sofia CFS via Antwerp to South Africa and fortnightly service from Varna CFS via Singapore.

Ports served: Capetown, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Johannesburg.

Service from Sofia CFS:

Weekly departures from Sofia CFS.
Closing Thursday end of the day.
Departure of the truck on Friday.
Arrival of the consolidation truck at Antwerp port on Wednesday and getting on the first available vessel.

Tranzit times:

Sofia CFS – Cape Town CFS: 35 days
Sofia CFS – Durban CFS: 39 days
Sofia CFS – Port Elizabeth CFS: 38 days
Sofia CFS – Johannesburg CFS: 41 days

Tranzit times are calculated from departure of the truck from Sofia CFS and includes the waiting time at Antwerp.

Service from Varna CFS:

Closing day before consolidation container departure to Singapore.

Tranzit times to Cape Town, Durban and Port Elizabeth: 55-60 days from sailing from Varna West.

Tranzit time to Johannesburg – 62-67 days from Varna West

The tranzit time includes – sailing time from Varna West to Singapore, transhipment in Singapore and sailing time from Singapore to South African ports.

Based on the above  services we also provide value added products:

– pick-up of your loads anywhere in Bulgaria or neighboring countries
– export customs processing
– any other services which might be requested

For request and quotes please contact Bulgarian freight forwarder and logistics provider KG SID Ltd.

For more information on KG CARGO freight forwarding service please contact us.

Beware prepaid freight and shipments from China

Recently, I have joined an interesting discussion in LinkedIn concerning the “Chinese system of prepaid LCL Shipments”

I am sure the majority of you have experience with this system which cannot be called Chinese at all because it is also applied in India and all over the world where there is no transparency of cost.

Regrettably none of the participants of the discussion has spoken about one very important point.

Chinese freight market is in principle FOB market – which means driven by the consignees not the shippers.

Normally the deals in China are made on FOB terms.  If any other terms of delivery are used – be careful.

If the Chinese supplier provides you and EXW rate for the products that they want to export that, in most of the cases, means that they do not have proper export license so when it comes to the export you need to “buy” such a license – which cost between 100-200 dollars.  This is the easier part because normally the consignee gets the proposal from their forwarder and knows in front all the costs involved – from warehouse where the goods are loaded up to the warehouse where the goods need to be finally delivered.

The difficulties come with the CPT, CIF, C&F quotations.  Than the buyer must be very aware of all the costs related to the delivery of the freight to them.  And here the system of hidden costs come in full power.  Chinese shipper goes to the forwarder and negotiates with them a very low rate – FCL, LCL, air – no matter the system is the same.  This rate is under priced – 15 usd w/m obviously can not cover the cost of LCL filled 40′ container and is very very low rate which does not cover the service.  The rate is normally to port or CFS and – now beware – “all local costs are for the account of consignee” The moment the buyer sees such a definition they should know that most probably the overall cost for getting the goods to their warehouse will be twice as high as the cost if the shipment has been moved FOB. Unless, the buyer has a clear quotation from his Chinese colleagues on DDU charges – my recommendation is – do not buy that “cheap” rate.  Because it is not “cheap” at all.

Rarely, it appears, and we should admit this, that the shipper and consignee have agreed to split the transportation terms – this is done only between longterm partners who trust each other and who know – both sides – how much the cost is from door-to-door.  But this situation has nothing to do with the unethical system of hidden costs.

How to avoid it.  It is simple. Whenever you buy from China and India – never ask local forwarders for a quotation. Turn to a forwarder at your end and ask for proposal which includes not only the ocean freight or airfreight cost to the nearest destination port or airport. Ask them to quote you to your door. Then you will  have a clear picture of what how much the delivery of the purchased goods costs.

For shipments into Bulgaria please do not hesitate to contact us for a airfreight  price or ocean freight quotation.

For more information on KG CARGO freight forwarding service please contact us.

Comment on Terms of Carriage on BOL

Below I am posting the comment made from Mr. John M. Daley in the discussion Did you ever read the backside ( risks, obligations, jurisdictions ) of you Bills of Lading which  has been opened at the  Freight and Logistics Professionals group of Linkedin.

Comment on Terms of Carriage on the backside of the BOL

by John Daley

Since I frequently write the terms and conditions on bills of lading for my clients (including motor carriers, NVOCC’s and ground and air freight forwarders), I am pretty familiar with the terms on bills of lading for all modes domestically, and for air and ocean internationally.

Although carriers do try to limit their liability, they are restricted from doing so by various laws (including the Carmack Amendment for motor carriage) and international carriage (e.g., the Montreal Convention for air carriage and Hague Rules for ocean carriage, adopted in the U.S. as the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act). For example, under the Carmack Amendment, motor carriers must offer shippers a “choice of rates” to enforce a limitation of liability. Although COGSA does not have a “choice of rates” requirement, the $500 per package limitation is more than adequate for many situations, although not all.

There is a historical basis for these limitations, and there are always ongoing discussions about whether the limitations should be increased. For example, the U.S. and several other countries recently signed off on the “Rotterdam Rules,” which, if adopted, will increase both the amount and the scope of the ocean carriage limitation of liability (if you are interested, I have a discussion of the Rotterdam Rules in an article posted on my web site at www.johnmdaley.com). In 1995, the U.S. Department of Transportation conducted a study of cargo loss limitations, but nobody seemed all that interested in doing anything about it.

So what should a shipper do? In many cases, shippers have the option of increasing the limitation of liability by paying a higher rate. In ocean and motor carrier, shippers can also enter into contracts with carriers. For many shippers, however, the best option is to carry appropriate cargo insurance.

As Mr. Serfass points out, however, policies of insurance (including those issued to carriers, by the way) always have limitations and exclusions, so anyone who purchases a policy of insurance should be sure to read the policy as soon as it arrives, before there is a claim. If a problem is noted (e.g., if a shipper frequently ships a product which is excluded from coverage), it is frequently possible to obtain a rider which will resolve the problem, sometimes at no additional cost.

If you are a shipper and have an ongoing relationship with a carrier and are concerned with a specific term or condition, you should bring the problem to the carrier’s attention and see if it can be modified. Since we are no longer in a government regulated tariff environment, individual modifications are possible.

Risks, obligations, jurisdictions of the Bill of Lading

Recently I have followed an interesting discussion in Freight and Logistics Professionals group of Linkedin. The discussion has been opened by Mr. René Woestenburg and the topic is:

Did you ever read the backside ( risks, obligations, jurisdictions ) of you Bills of Lading.

The discussion attracted many interesting comments from various participants in the ocean transportation – freight forwarders, insurers, lawyers, shipowners, bankers etc.

One of the main points which has been commented was that today’s Terms of Carriage, risks, obligations and liabilities are outdated and do not properly reflect the new realities and relationships in the ocean transportation.

It seems that Carrier is not responsible for almost anything and one of the participants in the discussion has even made the statement that this is not the way to make a long term relationships.

From the otherside however we should admit that the Carrier should consider many factors influencing the safety and security of vessel and that the voayage is subject to many unpredictable influences like wheather, political situation and various legislations governing the carriage of goods by sea.

The most active and interesting comments were made by:

Bruce Serfass who did not saved the critics towards the insurance companies enaged in covering transportation risks.

Mr. John Daley has made a detailed explanation to the terms and the logic behind them.

Kay Nasseir who presented the bankers point of view.

Sushil Baboo who looked at the issue from shipowner’s viewpoint.

I hope this resume of the discussion to help you to find the most useful moments in it.  This discussion makes you think about something which I am sure you rarely do when you ship freight – what are your rights as a customer and what are the responsibilities of all participants in the chain from your warehouse to your customer’s door.